A randomized controlled trial for parents of hospitalized children: keeping kids safe from guns

GVPedia Study Database

A randomized controlled trial for parents of hospitalized children: keeping kids safe from guns

Category: Firearm Availability, Youth|Journal: Hospital Pediatrics|Author: A Silver, G Azzarone, K O'Connor, M Curley, M Kim, N Dodson, R Eisenberg|Year: 2021

Objectives

To assess an educational intervention (BeSMART) for parents of hospitalized children on behaviors, beliefs, and knowledge about firearm safety.

 

Methods

A randomized controlled, 3-arm preintervention and postintervention study compared BeSMART video and handout interventions (with and without physician review) to tobacco smoke videos and handouts (control) on parental behaviors, beliefs, and knowledge. Eligibility criteria included parents and/or guardians residing with hospitalized children aged <20 years. The primary outcome was a change in parent-reported frequency of asking about guns in homes visited by their children preintervention to 1 month after intervention. Secondary outcomes were parent-reported likelihood of asking about guns in others’ homes immediately postintervention and change in firearm safety beliefs and/or knowledge in the intervention versus control group, analyzed with analysis of variance. McNemar’s and paired t tests compared changes within groups, and generalized estimating equations compared change between groups for the primary outcome.

 

Results

A total of 225 participants enrolled. Both intervention and control groups revealed significant increase mean in parent-reported Likert score of frequency of asking about guns within groups preintervention to 1 month after intervention (BeSMART: 1.5 to 2.3, P = .04; BeSMART + physician review: 1.4 to 1.9, P = .03; control: 1.4 to 2.3, P = .01). Change between groups was not significant (P = .81). Immediately postintervention, intervention groups reported higher likelihood of asking about guns (P < .001). Study groups revealed no significant differences in beliefs. Firearm safety knowledge increased significantly in the intervention groups.

 

Conclusions

BeSMART firearm injury prevention intervention in a hospital setting increased parental knowledge regarding firearm safety. Immediately postintervention, BeSMART groups reported higher likelihood of asking about guns in others’ homes compared with controls. At 1 month after intervention, all groups reported increased frequency asking about guns. Future investigations are needed to understand the duration of intervention impact.

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