Impact of a firearm safety device distribution intervention on storage practices after an emergent mental health visit

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Impact of a firearm safety device distribution intervention on storage practices after an emergent mental health visit

Category: Behavior, Youth|Journal: Academic Pediatrics|Author: A Tsogoo, B Strelitz, C Paris, E Bennett, J Jensen, K Cappetto, K Schloredt, L Rutman, M Bradford, N Uspal|Year: 2021

Objective

To determine if providing firearm storage devices with training during clinical care improves safe storage practices in household members of children who present to a pediatric hospital with an emergent mental health complaint.

 

Methods

Prospective, pre-post study. Enrollment occurred in the emergency department or the inpatient psychiatric unit. Participants in the observation phase received usual care. Participants in the intervention phase were randomized to be offered a firearm storage device at either no or low ($5) cost and trained in its use. We surveyed participants at enrollment, 7, & 30 days post visit. Our primary outcome was triple-safe storage (TSS) – storing firearms unloaded, locked, and with ammunition stored and locked separately.

 

Results

About 256 participants enrolled. In the observation phase TSS increased from 21% (95% confidence interval [CI] 14%–30%) at baseline to 31% (95% CI 21%–42%) at 7 and 31% (95% CI 21%–43%) at 30 days. In the intervention phase, TSS increased from 32% (95% CI 25%–39%) at baseline to 56% (95% CI 48%–64%) at 7 and 56% (95% CI 47%–64%) at 30 days. Among those not practicing TSS at baseline, 7-day TSS was higher in the intervention (38%) versus the observation phase (14%, P = .001).

 

Conclusions

Distribution and training in the use of firearm storage devices increased TSS in the study population, improves pediatric safety and should be part of the routine care of these high-risk patients.

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