Examining the role of lifestyle and criminal history variables on the risk of homicide victimization

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Examining the role of lifestyle and criminal history variables on the risk of homicide victimization

Category: Crime, Homicide, Youth|Journal: Homicide Studies (full text)|Author: E Tanner-Smith, M Ezell|Year: 2009

This study uses a lifestyle and routine activities (LSRA) approach to examine the offender—victim overlap in the case of lethal victimization. Longitudinal arrest and mortality data from three samples of individuals released from the California Youth Authority (CYA) are used to examine the lifestyle and criminal history factors that influence the risk of homicide victimization. Results from counting process Cox proportional hazards models indicate that gang membership, the period after release from incarceration, violent arrest history, ethnicity and race, county of release, and family criminality are all significantly related to the bivariate and multivariate risk of homicide victimization. However, other lifestyle and criminality factors such as alcohol and drug abuse and total offense history fail to predict the risk of homicide victimization. The article concludes with a discussion of the results in terms of their implications for theory, public policy, and future research needs.

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